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Saturday, October 28, 2006

Just War Theory

This is my favorite cartoon from the National Catholic Reporter (NCR) files.



I don't think it needs a caption, but I do wonder exactly which part of the "JWT" has given them such a giggle.

Anyone out there want to venture a guess? Best caption wins a free map to the exact secret location of the Weapons of Mass Destruction.

4 comments:

Lisa said...

Elizabeth, I saw the cartoon before I read your comment. When I saw the image, I thought the two figures were Jesus and Mahatma Ghandi. And they're cracking up that there would be any such thing as a "just-war theory." For they were both quite clear: Murder is wrong. Killing is wrong. So war is wrong. And you can't cloak it in some theory of "just war." It worked for me. But I'm a simple person.

Grace said...

Lisa and Mother Kaeton,

I'm hearing ya, and I respect your position. But, I struggle with this, and really in coming to the correct interpretation of the teaching of our Lord. We live in a broken, fallen world. What if there are times when force is literally the only way to save innocent lives? Should we have used even lethal force against Hitler to save the lives of innocent Jewish people?

Just to bring this down to a personal level. If someone broke into my home, and was in the process of assaulting and murdering my family, I would do everything possible to protect them even if it meant, God forbid the use of lethal force.

I think as Christians we should always do our best to work and pray for peace. But, is peace always possible? Then what??

God help us! We certainly need His wisdom in this.

Elizabeth Kaeton said...

God help us indeed.

David Huff said...

I certainly understand where Grace is coming from. But I think my objections to "Just War" theory are the same as the ones I have to that old, sententious saying, "Hate the sin, not the sinner."

That maxim always seems to be hauled out by people who want to use the word "hate" and still feel clean afterwards. And everyone I've heard harping on about "Just War" seems to be focused on the "War" part, with short shrift given to "Justice"...