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Thursday, April 12, 2007

I'm Always Chasing Rainbows

It's been a long, difficult winter - more so for some than others - but hope always springs eternal, for we are a people of hope.

Tonight, my dear friend Wayne and I celebrated Easter and that promise of the new life of Spring with a wonderful dinner at Dos Locos in Rehoboth Beach (We had the Thursday night special "Black and Blue Louisiana Style Hamburgers." Yum! Friday nights are one full pound of Alaskan King Crab Legs - 1/2 price. My favorite!)

As we were finishing our dinner, it grew dark and began to rain. Hard. The way it does in the mid-Atlantic states. It begins with a wild frenzy, then the rain comes down in sheets, and then it gradually tapers down and ends with a sputter of spray.

Just as we were preparing to leave, I looked out the window and both Wayne and I were speechless! There, rising in a perfect arch above the ocean was a double rainbow.

Wayne grabbed his camera and snapped this from the middle of the street.
















I ran and got my umbrella from my car and, arm and arm, Wayne and I made our way down the 1/2 block to the ocean, along with several others, to marvel at Mother's Nature's evening show.

Isn't this absolutely amazing?

It reminded me of that wonderful song, which I first heard performed by Jane Oliver in Boston in 1977 - "I'm Always Chasing Rainbows."

Okay, okay, boys. I know. I know. It was first sung by Judy Garland in the film ZIEGFELD GIRL in 1941. I'm just sayin' that the the first time I heard it was in 1977 and when Jane sang it, there wasn't a dry eye in the house.

I wish I had MadPriest's ability to play music on my website. Maybe he'll grace us with the tune. Until then, here are the words.

Enjoy.















I'm always chasing rainbows,
Watching clouds drifting by.
My schemes are just like all my dreams
Ending in the sky.

Some fellows look and find the sunshine,
But I always look and find the rain.
Some fellows make a winning sometime,
I never even make a gain.

Believe me,
I'm always chasing rainbows
Waiting to find a little bluebird in vain.

Words by Harry Carroll, music by Joseph McCarthy, 1918

7 comments:

Lauren Gough said...

I grew up with that song, the Judy Garland version. We had it on a 78rpm (yep I AM that old!) and I used to play it when I cleaned my room on Saturday mornings.

Great photos, Elizabeth. Thanks

Bill said...

All right, all this talk of rainbows and Judy Garland has just given me a flashback. When I was a kid(no smirks, I was young once)we used to go to the movies on a Saturday. For 25 cents, you would get in and watch monster movies all day long. One day, I was alone and went to see the Mole men. The second feature was "The Wizard of Oz". I had no problems whatsoever with mole people draging people underground, but the Wizard of Oz was another story. When the wicked witch was throwing fire at Dorothy I got up and left. That was just too real and too scary for me. That witch scared the hell out of me. Funny how word association brings back memories so long forgotten. Women were supposed to be loving and nurturing. I think that the concept of one being that evil was more than I was ready to handle at eleven years old, sitting in a dark theater alone.

Elizabeth Kaeton said...

Which is why, Bill, I love the Sondheim witch. Her great line in INTO THE WOODS: "I'm the witch. I'm not good. I'm not bad. I'm just right. I'm the witch."

Bill said...

Ah, Elizabeth, there you are. I knew you were relaxing floating in blogspace somewhere.

Since reading "Wicked" some years back, I've changed my opinion of the wicked witch. Elfaba is now one of my heroines. She was slandered outrageously over the decades. She was ostracized from society for being different. Now, some of us know how that feels. There are lessons to be learned from her story.

the cajun said...

Hey!
Sister dear, why no mention of the TWO rainbows? I was asked by many locals today if I witnessed the TWO rainbows over the Atlantic.
They truly were gifts to us all, and so are you.
Last evening was another gift and I am glad we share it together.
I just have to get used to this "point and shoot" camera.

Elizabeth Kaeton said...

Ah, mon cheri - Put on yur glasses, eh?

A DOUBLE rainbow = TWO rainbows.

I know. I know. A mind is a terrible thing to lose.

stumpjumper said...

Sister,
Being a graduate of the Evelyn whatever, speed reading school, I totally missed "double."
Still, an event to remember and cherish.
Friends seeing the two in Lewes said they had never seen twins before and that the sun had to be in just the right place for this to be visible.
They may be true, since rainbows are only visible in the morning and evening when the sun is at specific angle in the sky.
I like to think it was a sign of something more, something fomenting, and something positive to come.
My eye appt. is next week. Hrumph!